Wednesday, April 1, 2015

2015 Divine Mercy novena, Divine Mercy Sunday schedule


St. Bernard presents the Divine Mercy novena and celebration of Divine Mercy Sunday.

We welcome you to attend this wonderful nine-day event that will be filled with prayer, adoration, song and worship.

Our Lord’s promise of complete forgiveness is both a reminder and a call. It is a reminder that he is truly present and truly alive in the Eucharist, filled with love for us and waiting for us to turn to him with trust. And it is a call for us all to be washed clean in his love through confession and holy communion no matter how terrible our sins.

He is offering us a new start.

Novena schedule

NOVENAS


April 3 (Good Friday)

6 p.m. in the St. Joseph room of the St. Bernard Church Pastoral Center

April 4 (Holy Saturday)

6 p.m. in the St. Joseph room of the St. Bernard Church Pastoral Center

April 5 (Easter Sunday of the Resurrection of the Lord)

6 p.m. in the church

April 6 (Monday in the Octave of Easter)

6 p.m. in the church

April 7 (Tuesday in the Octave of Easter)

6 p.m. in the church

April 8 (Wednesday in the Octave of Easter)

6 p.m. in the church

April 9 (Thursday in the Octave of Easter)

6 p.m. in the church

April 10 (Friday in the Octave of Easter)

6 p.m. in the church

April 11 (Saturday in the Octave of Easter)

6 p.m. in the church

Divine Mercy Sunday schedule

Everyone is invited to join us in the celebration of Divine Mercy Sunday. A fellowship will follow in the parish hall; food will be served.

SACRAMENT OF RECONCILIATION

April 12 (Second Sunday of Easter)

1:45 p.m. in the church 

MASS

April 12 (Second Sunday of Easter)

3 p.m. in the church

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Looking Ahead

Father Perry D. Leiker
By Father Perry D. Leiker

A "Hosanna to the Son of David," shouts the crowd as the liturgy of Palm Sunday begins.

"Crucify him!" is shouted just as loudly and brings to a conclusion the readings from the word (the Gospel reading of the Passion of Mark).

A crowd simply can’t be any more fickle than this. The crowd is a classic example of a mob – easily excited and easily manipulated. The crowd doesn’t think for itself. The crowd doesn’t know what is really happening but only perceives the feeling welling up within itself.

If a convincing voice cries out "murder," then the crowd must provide the one to be murdered. The crowd is so easily used to achieve even horrific ends. This scene is an old scene; it is a present scene, and it is the future. It is simply human.

Although history teaches lessons, it doesn’t necessarily teach people how to think or how to live moral lives. This is one reason the church believes in the need for the forming of consciences. This is why the church seeks to think through and attempt to communicate logical, thoughtful and wise ways to live our lives as Christians.

The church is not perfect. The church has made mistakes throughout history. But the church certainly makes an honest and helpful contribution to the human race in attempting to figure out how we can live – not like crowds and mobs, but rather like thoughtful, caring, faith-filled followers of Jesus Christ.

Father Perry D. Leiker is pastor of St. Bernard Church. Reach him at (323) 255-6142, Ext. 112, or email pleiker@stbernard-church.com.

St. Bernard Mass intentions


Offering Mass for a special intention is a long standing tradition in the Catholic Church. It is usually considered that special graces are obtained for whom the Mass is celebrated.


Masses are offered for many reasons, for the souls in purgatory, in remembrance for someone who is deceased, or in honor of a birthday. 

If you would like to have a Mass celebrated for someone, visit the parish office. We will help you with the dates and times which are available. 

As a way to allow as many St. Bernard parishioners and friends as possible to schedule Masses, the following policies are put forth to help accomplish this goal: 

1. Requests will be honored on a first-come, first-served basis in the order in which they are received. 

2. A $10 stipend, as determined by archdiocesan policy, is to accompany each Mass intention. 

3. All intentions must be placed in person; no Mass request will be taken over the telephone.

4. Mass intentions will be granted as close to the requested date and time as possible. If it is not possible to comply with the primary request, the next closest date and time will be scheduled.



Week of March 30 to April 5, 2015 

 

March 30 | Monday of Holy Week

8 a.m.: Msgr. Gerald McSorley, Alfonso Gregorio, and Dr. Ignacio Nolasco — rest in peace

March 31 | Tuesday of Holy Week

8 a.m.: Rodolfo Flores rest in peace

April 1 Wednesday of Holy Week

8 a.m.: Erotida Meris — rest in peace 

April 2 | Holy Thursday

8 a.m.:
No daily Mass

April 3 | Good Friday of the Lord's Passion

8 a.m.: No daily Mass

April 4 | Holy Saturday

8 p.m.: Easter Vigil in the Holy Night of Easter

April 5 | The Resurrection of the Lord

8 a.m.: Aristoteles Galicia rest in peace
9:30 a.m.: Brian Hodge rest in peace
11 a.m.: Martin Villa happy birthday
12:30 p.m.: Juana Zuñiga, and Antonio Sotelo rest in peace

St. Bernard Sunday Homilies podcast

Our Sunday Homilies podcast features recordings of homilies given by our parish and visiting priests, alternating between the 8 and 9:30 a.m. Sunday Masses.

You can listen to each episode individually via our SoundCloud player found below each episode description. Or you can listen to episodes on our SoundCloud page.

Subscribe on our iTunes podcast page to listen to the podcast with your favorite MP3 player.

 

Sunday, March 29, 2015
Palm Sunday of the Lord's Passion
By Father Perry D. Leiker
   
"This story begins with Jesus. In the end, it's all about what we think and feel about it within ourselves, because this is where it has an impact," Father Perry tells us in his homily for Palm Sunday of the Lord's Passion. "It is meant to penetrate into us into our hearts and minds and make a huge and important difference in our life."

Audio podcast





Sunday, March 22, 2015
Fifth Sunday of Lent
By Father Perry D. Leiker
   
"We need to go through the process of dying in order to go through the process of resurrection and finding life eternal," Father Perry tells us in his homily for the Fifth Sunday of Lent. "But this is more than that. ... We can fall so easily because we don't live in love."

Video podcast



Audio podcast


Friday, March 27, 2015

Sunday bulletins


On this page you will find our weekly Sunday parish bulletin in an electronic format, viewable on most computers and tablets.

Submissions of articles and events are always welcome, and they will appear on the bulletin at the discretion of the pastor and bulletin editor.

To publish an event or for more information about our Sunday bulletin, e-mail stbernardla@stbernardla.cc.

Bulletins are archived in Adobe Acrobat format.

To properly view the electronic version of our Sunday bulletin, you must download Adobe’s Acrobat Reader which is available for free from Adobe’s website.



Full St. Bernard Church Sunday bulletin archive



2015


January

     • January 4
     • January 11
     • January 18
     • January 25

February

     • February 1
     • February 8
     • February 15
     • February 22

March

     • March 1
     • March 8
     • March 15
     • March 22
     • March 29

Weekly and daily readings


Readings from scripture are part of every Mass. At least two readings, one always from the Gospels, (three on Sundays and solemnities) make up the Liturgy of the Word. In addition, a psalm or canticle is sung.
 

These readings are typically read from a lectionary, not a Bible, though the lectionary is taken from the Bible.
 

The 2014-2015 liturgical year Sunday readings are taken from Sunday cycle Year B. The daily readings are taken from weekday cycle Year I.



Sunday, March 29, 2015

Palm Sunday of the Lord's Passion


At the procession with palms — Gospel: 


Jesus' entry into Jerusalem. (Mark 11:1-10 or John 12: 12-16)


First reading

In spite of my sufferings I am not disgraced. I am not put to shame. (Isaiah 50:4-7)


Psalm
 

My God, my God, why have you abandoned me? (Psalm 22:8-9, 17-20, 23-24)

Second reading

 
Christ emptied himself, and God filled this emptiness with exaltation. (Philippians 2:6-11)


Gospel reading


The account of Christ’s passion according to Mark. (Mark 14:1 — 15:47 [15:1-39])


Sunday’s liturgical color: RED

Daily readings:

     • (Week of March 23 to March 28)
     • (Week of March 30 to April 4)

Questions
 

When have you experienced love transcending hurt? How have you denied or betrayed your relationship with Jesus? How have you sought to restore it?

Scripture to be illustrated

"All of you will have your faith shaken" (Mark 14:27).



— Catholic News Service

Sunday, March 15, 2015

Looking Ahead

Father Perry D. Leiker
By Father Perry D. Leiker

The princes, priests and people “added infidelity to infidelity” and even desecrated the temple.

John tells us that those who live in sin hate the light and love and are attracted to darkness. But just as Moses lifted up the serpent in the desert (those who looked at it were saved from their sin), so must the Son of Man be lifted up.

We must truly look to him, look at him, and discover his look of love at and for us. This is the good news of the word today.

The letter to the Ephesians today says it most succinctly: “God, who is rich in mercy, because of the great love he had for us, even when we were dead in our transgressions, brought us to life with Christ — by grace you have been saved.”

It is expressed eloquently in the A Cycle Gospel provided for our elect in the RCIA. The man born blind when asked by Jesus: “Do you believe in the Son of Man?” answered him: “Who is he, sir, that I may believe in him?”

Jesus answered: “You have seen him.”

The blind man now had sight: both physical and deeply spiritual. He could truly see! No more blindness. No more lack of recognition. No more darkness. Only sight!

Where are we in our journey of faith? Do we see – really? Do we recognize – really? Do we look for the light or darkness – really?

Jesus’ word today, as always, saves!

Father Perry D. Leiker is pastor of St. Bernard Church. Reach him at (323) 255-6142, Ext. 112, or email pleiker@stbernard-church.com.

Sunday, March 8, 2015

Holy Week and Easter schedule, 2015

Father Paul Henson, O.Carm., blesses palms during Palm Sunday services at St. Bernard. (Photograph by Michael J. Arvizu/St. Bernard)
During these weeks of Lent, the church has urged us to make the journey to Holy Week and Easter.

By prayer, penance, and works of charity, we seek to be ready to celebrate the saving mysteries of our redemption in the Passion, Death, and Resurrection, of Jesus.

Please join our parish family for the special liturgies by which we will enter into these mysteries and experience the great love of God for us.

We wish you and you family a blessed Easter, filled with peace and joy.

PENANCE SERVICES

Healing and reconciling is at the heart of our Christian life. It is Jesus’ call and gift to us. At the following churches and times, approximately 10 priests will be available in special penance and reconciliation services with the sacrament of confession available so all can prepare for the Easter celebrations healed, reconciled and renewed. This is a time to clean house, to get rid of guilt, and experience healing an renewal. All are welcome.

Every Friday 

6:30 p.m. at St. Dominic Church; 2002 Merton Ave., Los Angeles

March 24

7 p.m. at St. Bernard Church; 2516 W. Ave. 33, Los Angeles.

March 26

7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church; 322 N. Ave. 61, Los Angeles.

March 31

5:30 p.m. at St. Ann Church; 1365 Blake Ave., Los Angeles.

April 1

7 p.m. at Divine Saviour Church; 610 Cypress Ave., Los Angeles

There will be no confessions after Wednesday of Holy Week. The sacrament of reconciliation will be conferred by appointment only.

DATES for HOLY WEEK and EASTER SUNDAY

MASSES

March 28 (Saturday Vigil Mass)

5 p.m.: Mass in English.

March 29 (Palm Sunday)

8 a.m.: Mass in English.
9:30 a.m.: Mass in English (solemn blessing of palms and procession at 9:20 a.m.).

11 a.m.: Mass in Spanish (solemn blessing of palms and procession at 10:50 a.m.).
12:30 p.m.: Mass in Spanish.

Distribution of blessed palms will take place at all Masses.

March 30 (Monday of Holy Week)

7 p.m.: Chrism Mass at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels   

March 30 to April 1 (Monday to Wednesday of Holy Week)

8 a.m.: Daily Mass in English.

Holy Triduum

Called the Holy Triduum, Thursday, Friday and Saturday are the three most sacred days of the year. These are days of quiet reflection and prayer for everyone, including our parish priests. 

Daily morning Mass at 8 will not be celebrated during the Holy Triduum; the 5 p.m. Saturday vigil Mass will not be celebrated on Holy Saturday. Daily morning Mass resumes at 8 on Monday, April 6.   

April 2 (Holy Thursday)

7 p.m.: Mass of the Lord's supper.
9:30 p.m. to midnight: Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament in the parish hall.

April 3 (Good Friday)

1 p.m.: Stations of the Cross
2 p.m.: Solemn liturgy of the Lord’s passion and death, with Holy Communion, in English
4 p.m.: Living Stations of the Cross
6 p.m.: Solemn liturgy of the Lord’s passion and death, with Holy Communion, in Spanish

April 4 (Holy Saturday)

8 p.m.: Vigil in the holy night of Easter (bilingual)

April 5 (Easter Sunday of the Resurrection of the Lord)

8 and 9:30 a.m.: Mass in English
11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.: Mass in Spanish (Misa en español)

May 24 (Pentecost Sunday)

8 and 9:30 a.m.: Mass in English
11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.: Mass in Spanish (Misa en español)

May 25 (Ordinary Time resumes)

8 a.m.: Daily Mass in English

Looking Ahead

Father Perry D. Leiker
By Father Perry D. Leiker

Question: “Why do I have to do this?” Answer: “Because I said so!”

Once again, a command or rule becomes more important than the reason for having it.

Every command or rule, however, should have a clear reason or value that makes good sense, is important, and makes life better for the person following it.

God speaks and calls us to follow for reasons that make good sense, have important value, and make life better for us. It is the reason we are urged in the scriptures not only to observe God’s commands but to love them.

Any organization, church or temple can become riddled with rules. Structures and practices to get around them are called loopholes.

Religion is supposed to bind us together in faith and to faith, not take the place of it. Faith, not religion, is the goal. Religion is the means to discover and live out our faith.

The temple and the money changers and the sacrificial offerings and the rules of offering, and the many, many, many things we observe, are all meant to lead us to God, to faith and to living commands and rules that make good sense, have value and make life better for us.

Every once in a while it becomes necessary to turn over the tables and turn things upside down. We have councils and changes and new translations and changes of leadership – all unravel, reconnect and ask of us to open to the new or to renew.

And really, at the heart of it all, Jesus is the one turning over the tables and turning things upside down.

Father Perry D. Leiker is pastor of St. Bernard Church. Reach him at (323) 255-6142, Ext. 112, or email pleiker@stbernard-church.com.

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Looking Ahead

Father Perry D. Leiker
By Father Perry D. Leiker

Abraham promised everything – even the sacrificing of his own son.

God gave everything – even his own son handed over to the cross.

In a mystical and divine moment, Jesus was transfigured before the eyes of a few select disciples. For a moment they saw him in his glory. Then came a voice: "This is my beloved Son. Listen to him. Suddenly, looking around, they no longer saw anyone but Jesus alone with them."

Perhaps we have had our Abraham moments – offering everything we are and have to God. Perhaps we have stopped to appreciate the total gift of Jesus Christ to us and can say that we know we are loved. Perhaps we have even been blessed with mystical and divine moments of grace that have transformed us.

Eventually, we return to the moment like the disciples: "looking around we no longer see anyone but Jesus" –  the Jesus who silently and gently lives within us.

Lent is about accepting this Jesus every day in very ordinary ways as we simply, slowly and continually walk our journey of faith.

Most of our faith life is coming down the mountain and doing the ordinary things of life in extraordinary ways, because we have indeed known the glory of the Lord.

Father Perry D. Leiker is pastor of St. Bernard Church. Reach him at (323) 255-6142, Ext. 112, or email pleiker@stbernard-church.com.